AROUND TOWN: “Show #9” at The Parlour Bushwick

Show #9

Location: The Parlour Bushwick, 791 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11221
Exhibition Dates: January 25 through March 9, 2014
Opening Reception: January 25, 2014 from 6:00pm to 9:00pm
Gallery Hours: Sunday from 12:00pm to 6:00pm and By Appointment
Contact: info@theparlourbushwick.com or (718) 360-3218 / (718)360-6973

Text from their website:

The Parlour Bushwick is pleased to present “Show #9”. The opening reception will take place Saturday, January 25 from 6 – 9pm. The Parlour Bushwick is located at 791 Bushwick Avenue, Brooklyn NY 11221. The exhibition will run until Sunday, March 9, 2014. The gallery is open Sunday from 12 pm – 6 pm and by appointment. 


The work in show # 9 exudes a minimal aesthetic. Simplicity rather than decoration guarantees the essentialness of the piece. The work speaks to you thoughtfully as if carefully controlled. That is not to say that chance does not play a role in their process. In fact, all the artists’ experiment with the materials they work with whether it is a printer, a form or a surface. The decisions made during their process, calculated or random have an introspective quality.

Andrea Monti’s polaroids are a result of playing with different techniques, including multiple-exposure, long exposure, interference, addition of filters, as well as straightforward shots documenting his life. The accumulation of these images creates a sensory experience that describes a quiet and pensive solitude. On the other hand, much of his work can be playful. His piece entitled “The Most Useless Machine Ever” not only is a study in futility but is also a documentation of what has become a universal pastime – obsessively watching seemingly ridiculous and random subjects on the Internet. Combining YouTube videos of other peoples’ obsession with building and then displaying machines that immediately shut themselves off is a meditation in the act of nonsense and displays a sense of mischief.

Stacy Scibelli’s work is a contemplation on form. Intuitive and conceptual, her pieces are made to look like clothing but are impossible to wear. They call to mind minimalist art and fashion while denying the functionality of the clothing adding an element of frustration and suprise.

MaryKate Maher makes terrestrial-like objects that are based on notions of how to manipulate and control nature. The perilous arrangement of rocks in “Cairn,” convey a metaphorical unease. You don’t expect the rocks to fall nor the paper bag that supports it. The piece stands as its own entity, free from the laws of gravity. It is the restrained elegance and careful placement of parts that draw associations and mood while defying a narrative.

Images courtesy of The Parlour Bushwick.

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