EVENTS: BYO Art, Performances, Brooklyn Acts’ Music Video Premiere! SAT. MARCH 1ST

1899922_858498024176455_69351442_n
Saturday, March 1st

BYO Art with the theme “Our Changing Streets”

Artwork will be hung 5-6pm (first come first serve regarding wall space)

Brooklyn Acts is a volunteer run performing arts youth program! They are premiering the music video for their song “Our Changing Streets,” and are looking for local artists to hang artwork during the Premiere: 6-8pm

There will be LIVE Screen Printing by Bushwick Print Lab so bring a shirt!!!

There will be food provided by little skips
Coffee Provided by Express Yourself Barista Bar

-fee to participate $5 ****All proceeds go to Brooklyn Acts (kid’s snacks, performance materials, sets, costumes etc)-

email brooklynacts[at]gmail[dot]com with any questions!

1795977_865150246844566_725536158_o

REVIEW: The Gastro-Fantasy: Thoughts Surrounding “Workin’ in Ah Hole Mine” at 247365 Gallery

Written by Conor O’Brien, Living Gallery

Photos were taken at “Workin’ In Ah Hole Mine,” an exhibition at 247365 Gallery featuring artwork by Michael Mahalchick and Jacques Louis Vidal. 247365 is one of three galleries part of the Donut District located in Red Hook.

"Jerk Off Material" -Michael Mahalchick

“Jerk Off Material” -Michael Mahalchick

The bed is a stand-in for the stomach, a stage for gastro-intenstinal performance. Warmth is conducive to sleep in the same way heat is conducive to digestion. Thus, the desire for warmth stems from the desire to be digested.

Left: "Frame," Michael Mahalchick. Center: "A Hole Mine," Jacques Louis Vidal. Right: "Crutches," Michael Mahalchick

Left: “Frame,” Michael Mahalchick. Center: “A Hole Mine,” Jacques Louis Vidal. Right: “Crutches,” Michael Mahalchick

Each night we enter these artificial stomachs and, pulling over our bodies sheets reminiscent of fur, flesh, blood, intestinal walls, enact the gastro-fantasy: to sink into this salty, enzymatic foam; to be broken down and sent through drainpipes into sewage treatment plants and then dumped like pollutants into rivers; to have our genetic material fed back into the oceanic laboratory that engineers new species; to then be spewed back out, by regurgitation or excretion, and return.

"A Hole Mine," Tile detail -Jacques Louis Vidal

“A Hole Mine,” Tile detail -Jacques Louis Vidal

Excretion is an act of destruction which, because it fails to obliterate, ends parodically in creation, or an anti-creation whose necessary impulse is destruction. The in-between state: a destruction that can never fully destroy, a creation that can never fully be.

"Crutches" -Michael Mahalchick

“Crutches” -Michael Mahalchick

The stomach and the womb are often metonymic: digestion parodies birth. In this the digestive drive and the artistic act are aligned. White walls recall the toilet bowl, the blank page, an infantile reaction to that silent white, the need to soil/ disrupt, then flush/ reset; two actions that, through Pavlovian repetition, induce a deep satisfaction, the illusion of two extreme states: appearance and disappearance, positive and negative.

"Magnets" -Michael Mahalchick

“Magnets” -Michael Mahalchick

The in-between state fails to respond to the Pavlovian tick, which then echoes without answer, half-digested, a vague, lingering discomfort. Here nothing appears and nothing disappears. Nothing even changes form, everything is always transitioning between: endlessly vibrating with organic dissonance. A manic cycle between a mechanical, static positive and absolute zero, never settling on one, never fully achieving either. This friction produces an electric pulse.

"Savarin" -Michael Mahalchick

“Savarin” -Michael Mahalchick

Objects and materials have a potentiality that can be preserved in the creation of art pieces if the materials are used in ways that are unconventional, free-associative, etc. Forms that defy definition or identification retain a certain formlessness, or at least contain both form and formlessness.

"Unknown Pleasures (Corner)" -Jacques Louis Vidal

“Unknown Pleasures (Corner)” -Jacques Louis Vidal

A form is in part its physical qualities/ limits and in part the associative limits imposed on it (preconceived notions of functionality, classification, genre, etc). When the latter set of limits are blurred or transgressed the object regresses back to a state of energetic potentiality, until another term is invented or a preexisting term is expanded to encompass this form.

"Unknown Pleasures (Wall)"  -Jacques Louis Vidal

“Unknown Pleasures (Wall)” -Jacques Louis Vidal

In art, terms are created, values assigned, expectations fostered all for the purpose of subversion, just as certain religions encourage (by implication) the ritualistic transgression of their own taboos.
In the middle of this tug of war between classification and deconstruction is experience, the object presented naked before you without any interpretive shield.

"Frame" -Michael Mahalchick

“Frame” -Michael Mahalchick

Art can approach this whirling, kinetic experience. Not simply recreate or represent it, but can itself be the volatile, pulsating link connecting the creative-destructive. The in-between state: an amphibious mutation gasping on shore, half-developed lungs full for the first time with alien atmosphere.

Picture 5

All photos on this post are © Conor O’Brien 2014

Gallery Location: 131 Huntington St.
Hours: Weekends Noon-6pm
Contact: communications@
twentyfourseventhree
sixtyfive.biz

Open Position: Social Media Intern

The Living Gallery in Bushwick is looking for a Social Media Intern! Great for someone who has some experience with WordPress, Facebook, and other forms of social media, and is interested in getting involved with the visual and performing arts! Please contact us via email for more details, and please include a resumé. Thank you! thelivinggallery@gmail.com

AROUND TOWN: Exhibition at Schema Projects

Exhibition at Schema Projects

Location: 92 St Nicholas Ave between Hart and Suydam Brooklyn NY 11237
Contact: info@schemaprojects.com

Owen Schuh
Accumulations: Drawings & Notebooks
Exhibition Dates: January 24 – February 16, 2014Schema Projects

PRESS RELEASE:

Schema Project is pleased to present the first exhibition devoted to Owen Schuh’s works on paper.

Schuh describes his dense and delicate works as “seeking to illuminate the entwining relations between embodied mind, mathematics, and the physical world.” Mapped out on sheets of stained or darkened paper, his delicate geometric figurations unfold across the surface and express his concentration as their glow emanates and draws us in.

Through research, he chooses mathematical functions that model the interactions and structure of living systems. Cellular automata, circle packing, fractals, and other topics in discrete mathematics form the basis of these systems. These “functions” bear the structure of life, but operate in the parallel world of the mind: a world of simulacra inhabited by numbers and abstract relationships.

The structure of the work is handcrafted using, at most, the aid of a pocket calculator. In each piece, he strives to manifest phenomena unique to the interaction between the physical medium and the logical structure. As Schuh describes, “the mathematical formula is a virus that depends on a host to carry out its peculiar kind of life until it terminates or the medium or the artist is exhausted.” In the end, the drawing is really only the physical trace of this activity—in this case, like a shimmering shell left behind on the beach.

Owen Schuh (born 1982, in Stevens Point, Wisconsin) lives and works in San Francisco. Initially pursuing biology, Schuh earned a degree in Fine Arts and Philosophy from Haverford College and an MFA from The Tyler School of Art, in Philadelphia, and Rome, Italy. He has exhibited nationally and internationally and lectures periodically on his work and algorithmic art practice. His work is included in the Kupferstichkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. He recently completed a two year residency at the San Francisco artist collective Root Division, where he taught after school classes in origami to under-served public school students.

Schema Backspace:
Rachael Wren
Arboreal

Schema Projects

The work of Rachael Wren navigates the territory between the geometric and the organic. In this collection of work, not unlike the “Ideal Cities” of Renaissance artists, she creates an “Ideal Forest”. On a grid that maps out the forest floor, ribbon-like verticals sprout upward, suggesting a logical space. This “personal wood”, achieves a sense of air and space through the use of traditional atmospheric perspective.

However, the entire monochromatic environment seems vulnerable, as it might collapse at any moment, soft yet strong, in it’s combination of thin ruled line and pale grays. Using these sparest of means, Wren’s drawings explore the universal duality between two and three-dimensional form, structure and randomness, and the known and the unknown.

Content within this post © 2013 Schema Projects

AROUND TOWN: Wayfarers Exhibition, “Not Everyone Feels Like They Have To Win All The Time”

Not Everyone Feels Like They Have To Win All The Time
New works by
Renee Delosh and Craig Hein
Location: Wayfarers, 1109 Dekalb Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11221
Exhibition Dates: January 31 – February 16, 2014
Gallery Hours: Sundays 1pm to 5pm and By Appointment
Gallery Contact: wayfarersbk@gmail.com

Wayfarers

Not Everyone Feels Like They Have To Win All The Time is an exhibition of new work by Renee Delosh and Craig Hein. Both artists share a similar approach in creating their work, lampooning the inherit seriousness of art-making and the significance of the art object, while concurrently addressing themes of faith and belief systems, death, failure and commodity culture.

Craig Hein’s small paintings and sculptures are intended to somewhat resemble gift shop souvenirs and collectables. His text-based work is also meant to reference “inspirational” posters like those that would be found on the wall of a high school guidance counselor’s office or more commonly infesting a Facebook or Twitter news feed. He is interested in the power dynamic between the “inspirer” and the “inspired,” whether it is through art, religion or the self-help industry.

Renee Delosh employs banal text and symbols in her work, exploring their relation to cartoons, cliché sayings and religious imagery. Her drawings, sculptures and paintings reference a Charlie Brownian view of the world – dashes of optimism tempered and often outweighed by sighs of grief. She works across a variety of media, choosing materials based on the idea behind each piece. The works share in common an anthropomorphic quality, through googley eyes peering outward or frames that lean toward one another like the resting heads of two friends.

Renee Delosh completed her BFA at the School of Visual Arts in 2009. She has exhibited in group shows in Brooklyn and New York City. Born in Huntington, NY, she currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Craig Hein has a BFA and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts. He has had one solo show in New York, and has been in group shows in New York, Philadelphia and a few other places. Craig is from New Jersey, currently lives in Manhattan and works on his artwork in Brooklyn.

Image details:

(left) Craig Hein, “Serenity Now”, 2013, oil and acrylic on canvas and clay, 5 in x 7 in

(right) Renee Delosh, “It Wasn’t Me”, 2013, cement and graphite with acrylic, 5.25 in x 3.25 in x 1.75 in

AROUND TOWN: Holly Coulis – PITCHERS – at Sardine BK

Holly Coulis - PITCHERS(Image Source)

Text from their Facebook Event Page:

Sardine is pleased to present PITCHERS, a solo exhibition by Holly Coulis. The exhibition opens Saturday, February 1 from 6 to 9pm and will be up through March 2, 2014.

PITCHERS features Holly’s recent body of still life paintings. Having worked with portraiture and landscape in the past, she continues to subtly recontextualize these traditional genres. Here, the still life is an open platform to talk about painting and to display the nuances of everyday life. The pitchers, vases, fruits etc. are immediately familiar but with time, they bend away from the commonplace into floating shadows, bright lines, and dreamy color. Oftentimes, the perspective is slightly skewed, awkward shapes replace naturally occurring shadows, and minute details contrast with broad strokes. Instead of being dramatic or idealized, everything that happens is poetic, humorous and personal.

Holly Coulis was born in Toronto, Canada and has lived and worked in Brooklyn since 1999. Her work has been shown in Toronto, Zurich, Chicago, Atlanta, Miami, and New York. She is represented by Cherry and Martin Gallery in Los Angeles and LaMontagne Gallery in Boston. Her most recent show was at Susanne Hilberry Gallery in Detroit.

Sardine is located on the ground floor of 286 Stanhope Street between Wyckoff and Irving Avenues in Bushwick, Brooklyn, one block from the Dekalb L train and near the Knickerbocker M. For more information, please visit sardinebk.com. Contact: Lacey Fekishazy and Jon Lutz at sardinebk@gmail.com

AROUND TOWN: Lots of exhibition openings!

LOTS OF OPENINGS AROUND BUSHWICK TODAY!

“Glorious Creatures,” an exhibition featuring artworks
by Jeff Davis, Deborah Mesa-Pelly, and Michael Wetzel.

Reception 6p-9p
Honey Ramka
56 Bogart St.
(646) 401-4431

Adam Simon: Swipe
Reception 6p-9p
Studio10
56 Bogart Street
(718) 852-4396

“PAST/FORWARD”
Reception 6p-9p
Amos Eno Gallery
1087 Flushing Avenue, Suite 120
(718) 237-3001

AZETTAGH
Reception 7p-10p
OUTLET Fine Art
253 Wilson Ave
(915) 525-0410

Reva Castillenti | Corporeal Digest
Reception 6p-9p
et al projects
56 Bogart Street
(914) 498-8328

Things That Barely Exist by Pancho Westendarp
Reception 6p-9p
Robert Henry Contemporary
56 Bogart St
(718) 473-0819

X-istential
Reception 6p-10p
Loft 594 Gallery
594 Bushwick Avenue
2nd Floor
(305) 205-9722

and a performance at
Grace Exhibition Space
“BODY/MASS” Performances
by Faith Johnson, Nyugen E. Smith,
Geraldo Mercado and Thomas Albrecht
Curated by Samuel Burhoe (with Jill McDermid and Esther Neff)
Doors 9:00 Performances 9:30-11:00 pm
Donation suggested $5-15
840 Broadway, 2nd Floor

TONIGHT: Bushwick Fashion Night & Art Opening!

Bushwick Fashion Night & Art Opening!

Bushwick Fashion Night & Art Opening!

at The Living Gallery, 1094 Broadway, Bushwick, NY

from 7:30pm to 11pm!

Bushwick Fashion Night is dedicated to Bushwick, in all its undefinable glory!

Lets not try to put ourselves in a box, or let ourselves be labeled!

Lets work with the pre-existing community, merging ideas, dreams, and designs!

Come dressed in your OWN designs and ready to DANCE!!

Featuring DJ Sewer G & Performance by CUM BLOOD Childproof:http://www.childproof.tv/

Vendors:
Jazzabelss Boutique
Jewels de Juliet
uta bra user design
NTasha HouseofKaluaah
www.veiraclothingco.com
L’Immortelle Leather

AFTER PARTY: Happyfun Hideaway

RSVP on the Facebook Event!

REVIEW: Candy Colored Clown: Response to “Economy Candy” at Harbor Gallery

Candy Colored Clown: Response to “Economy Candy” at Harbor Gallery
written by Conor O’Brien, The Living Gallery

Ross Moreno is clown apparel

Ross Moreno is clown apparel

Justin Cooper, dressed in park ranger garb, introduces himself as yet another park ranger who has moved to Brooklyn. He explains that like most park rangers, he needs a side job to support himself: so he does performance art. This joke works mostly on the level of its simplicity, specifically the awareness of its own simplicity. Most of the performance operates on this hyper-aware level wherein the jokes, magic tricks, and stunts adopt an aesthetic of simplicity and childish absurdity as the joke is often the joke itself: its awkward and/or childishly sincere delivery, basic structure, and anti-climatic punchline. Cooper and his partner Ross Moreno so often comment on the performance (usually self-deprecating) within the performance that it can become unclear at which point a seeming mistake is genuine or just part of the performance, part of its self-referentiality.

Another park ranger moving to Brooklyn

Another park ranger moving to Brooklyn

In the first part of the two-parted performance, Cooper makes a joke about his partner’s birth saying “He was born with a full head of hair, and a cigar in his hand that he used to cauterize his own fallopian tube.” Realizing his mistake, Cooper fumbles for the correct term, needing to ask the audience before he remembers what he meant to say is “umbilical cord.” By the time he returns to the punchline (“But I don’t believe it. Cause I don’t think he ever had hair”) the audience has already forgotten or lost interest in the joke’s set up, and the punchline loses all steam. But those who went to both performances would realize that what seemed as a genuine mistake was actually intentional, as Cooper repeats the same joke with the same mistake in the second show. The duo often undermine themselves in this way, and to some extent they do it to play with the audience: a Kaufman-esque effort to baffle, antagonize, or otherwise playfully prank the viewer. The performance feeds on audience reaction, its confusion or discomfort in particular, often going as far as implicating the audience in the performance, during moments where character/fourth wall is broken or the audience is invited (or more likely forced) to participate.

April Childers “Santa for all Seasons (Cheeseburger Santa)”

April Childers “Santa for all Seasons (Cheeseburger Santa)”

April Childers “Pocket”

April Childers “Pocket”

The two performances are part of Harbor Gallery’s “Economy Candy” exhibition. The name is taken from a Lower East Side candy shop that opened during the Great Depression. A candy shop which sells discount candy, whose existence is necessitated by a harsh economic reality, acts both as a distractive relief from those realities as well as a reminder of them, this reminder just thinly and almost mockingly veiled by the shop’s colorful, candied walls. This juxtaposition, the dual role of distraction and reminder, which can be applied to comedy and art as well as to candy shops, seems to be the main concept dealt with by the artists exhibited in the show. These artists, playfully and with a sense of humor, explore the ways that art can distract/ soothe/ even numb and the ways it can make reality felt more immediately. These two effects of art are not mutually exclusive, as all art contains some ratio of both, and each effect can be used to produce the other: reality, struggle, pain can be sublimated into entertainment while alternatively, as seems to be the case with some pieces in this exhibit, a more kitschy/ readily accessible aesthetic can be adopted exactly for the moment when it is broken, the veil lifted, and rather than being distracted, people are made more  keenly aware of their discomfort for the element of surprise.

Jeff De Golier “Spirit Lake”

Jeff De Golier “Spirit Lake”

Jeff De Golier “Motor Boat”

Jeff De Golier “Motor Boat”

Two pieces by April Childers use familiar symbols of American culture to make large, absurdist sculptures. “Pocket” is an oversized, denim pocket filled with a half-deflated beach ball so that it balloons out from the wall. With “A Santa for all Seasons (Cheeseburger Santa)” a cartoonish depiction of Santa Claus resembles an anthropomorphic cheeseburger. The combination of these otherwise harmless and familiar images creates a sculpture that is as unsettling as it is humorous. Jeff DeGolier creates sculptural collages using a variety of objects and materials: coffee cups, champagne glass, sawdust, glitter, mirrors, yarn. His piece “Motor Boat” is constructed from a car stereo and two large speakers which are draped in doilies and yarn, a collage of the loud and the delicate. Maria Britton makes abstract paintings using acrylic paint on bedsheets, which are wrinkled so that the canvas, rather than being simply a backdrop on which the piece is painted, asserts itself as being part of the piece. Alicia Gibson uses acrylic, oil, and spray paint to make colorful, loud, disorienting paintings which seem to reflect a chaotic experience of urban life.

Series by Maria Britton

Series by Maria Britton

Alicia Gibson “Notes of a Dirty old Woman”

Alicia Gibson “Notes of a Dirty old Woman”

Much of the humor in Justin Cooper and Ross Moreno’s performances come from playing with these two juxtaposed forces in art and comedy. At one point Moreno, dressed as a clown, performs a magic trick only to start berating the audience for not “understanding” it. Distraction and diversion are the fundamental techniques of a magician; it is important for the magician to divert the audience’s attention or mislead their expectations so that trick takes them by surprise. In the case of Moreno’s bit, it is the magic trick itself that is the diversion, they expect some sort of surprising conclusion to the trick but they do not expect the performer, dressed as he is in a clown costume, to suddenly turn on them. At one point Cooper plays a lounge singer who in between songs confesses to his lingering, debilitating depression. Similarly, the show’s “encore” features Cooper playing an overenthusiastic pitchman who at one point begins bleeding from his mouth and reveals a wound on his torso before collapsing to the ground. Their humor comes from diverting the audience in some way, with some silly/ childlike aesthetic, soothing lounge music, or excess of enthusiasm, only to allow the things broiling below the surface performance, some antagonism between performer and audience, depression, etc., to reveal itself.

The “Finale:” Justin Cooper attempts to break a cinderblock over Ross Moreno

The “Finale:” Justin Cooper attempts to break a cinderblock over Ross Moreno

All photos on this post are © Conor O’Brien 2014.

Gallery Location: 17-17 Troutman #258, Queens, NY 11385
Hours: Saturday/Sunday from 1pm to 6pm and By Appointment
Exhibition Dates: January 11th through February 16th, 2014!
Gallery Contact: info@harbor1717.com