TONIGHT: Opening Reception for NYC Pop Up Art Exhibition!

Open Call: NYC Pop Up Exhibition

Opening Reception: January 11th, 2014 from 7pm to 10pm
Exhibition Dates: January 11th through January 17th, 2014
Gallery Location: The Living Gallery, 1094 Broadway, Bushwick, Brooklyn
Hours: 2pm to 6pm and by appointment

For Immediate Release
January 1st, 2014

2014 New Year Pop Up Exhibition

Katherine Emely Gomez is pleased to announce the opening of NYC Pop Up Exhibition. An exhibition that will be open for the new year of 2014. From January 11 through January 17. The exhibition will be open from 2PM to 6PM and also by appointment. NYC Pop Up Exhibition welcomes the New Year into the arts. Opening Night will be on January 11th from 7PM to 10PM. Event is located at The Living Gallery (1094 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY 11221). Come and enjoy an eye opening & enriching experience: artworks of painting, printmaking, ceramic, photography, instillation, 3D and more.

Participating Artists

Aimee Hertog, Amanda Menezes, Amanda Saviñón, Annemarie Waugh, Asano Gomez, Bridget O’ Rourke, Diane Hawkins, Fred Gutzeit, Gregory Mason, Hillary Hostetler, Jamie Kates, Katherine Emely Gómez, Laura Jacobs, Lorena Kalaja, Alexis Martinez, Peter Pier, Roberto Ferrando, Shang-Ping Liu, Shifi Rathaus, Vanezza Cruz, Yi-Sun Ro

About Katherine Emely Gomez

Katherine Emely Gomez is a NYC based artist dedicated in organizing and curating a dynamic environment in which artists can share their ideas and encourage gallery exposure by supporting, promoting quality exhibitions. A notion of artists helping artists based on networking and collaboration. Gomez devotes her energy and resources in displaying a variety of emerging and established artists from an array of works including painting, print making, ceramic, photography, instillation, collage and more.

About The Living Gallery

The Living Gallery was founded in April of 2012 by Nyssa Frank. They offer emerging artists and teachers a platform for dreams to manifest. They seek to create an environment based on collaboration, not competition. The Living Gallery is a space where passion meets action. The Living Gallery will always be alive with new artwork, events, and idea. The New York Times Art & Design Article ”…Now it’s rising, and art is helping it, just as it is helping art by giving its makers a place to go. Ideally such synergy would hold; it can’t, because it never does. Still it’s hard not to feel a tug of hope under those big, open Bushwick skies.” – Written By Holland Cotter.

For more information on the exhibition, artists, and Katherine Emely Gomez please contact katherineemelygomez@gmail.com

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REVIEW: Violence of Everyday Objects: Thoughts on Phoenix Lindsey-Hall’s “Flame Tempered”

Violence of Everyday Objects: Thoughts on Phoenix Lindsey-Hall’s “Flame Tempered”
written by Conor O’Brien, The Living Gallery

"Flame Tempered"

“Flame Tempered”

The first object in Phoenix Lindsey-Hall’s show “Flame Tempered” is a ceramic knife. It is without much definition, and barely noticeable from a distance, fading into the white walls of the gallery. It seems small and fragile compared with the other pieces on display, especially the dramatic eponymous piece of the show. But this object sets a certain tone for when one goes on to encounter these other objects. The knife occupies a strange space in the world of objects: it belongs equally to the world of the everyday mundane and the world of violence. The particular knife Lindsey-Hall has chosen to cast highlights this fact. It is unclear without further definition whether this particular knife is a normal kitchen knife or some kind of hunting tool. The distinction between mundane object and weapon is obscured.

Objects do not have intent; they reflect the intent of their user. It is this reflective quality that is most unsettling aspect of everyday objects. And it is for this reason that even prior to understanding their context, the collection of ceramic objects exhibited in Lindsey-Hall’s show seem so unsettling cast in their ghostly, monochromatic white. The knife is the most obvious example of the crossover between the world of the mundane and the world of violence, but as soon as one is put into this frame of mind, it is difficult to not imagine the inherent danger of the other objects: a plunger, a bottle of bleach, a soup can, baseball bats. Without further definition, the objects in the show are reduced to pure reflectivity, bound neither by the world of the mundane or that of violence: each could cross with ease between these worlds.

Phoenix Lindsey-Hall speaking before the screening of 'Paris is Burning.'

Phoenix Lindsey-Hall speaking before the screening of ‘Paris is Burning.’

Phoenix Lindsey-Hall, a former lobbyist for queer-rights in Kentucky, researched and catalogued in a database a series of violent hate crimes targeting homosexual and transgender people, using this research to form the context for her work. While initially a photographer, Lindsey-Hall has of late produced ceramic sculptures of the everyday objects that she has discovered often become weapons in these violent crimes. At the “Paris is Burning” film screening and artist talk event at the Living Gallery, the artist talked about her process. She takes the ceramic objects out of their molds before they’ve dried completely so that she’s able to manipulate the slip. During the talk, she commented on how unlike photography, this process allowed her some intimacy with the object: how her hand-print is implicit in the manipulation of the clay, and how this manipulation of clay object parallels the violent act. It is an attempt at understanding the act by bringing her into closer intimacy with it, rather than the distanced understanding afforded by photography.

This process is most prominent in the surreal “Flame Tempered,” an installation of over 70 ceramic baseball bats, manipulated so as to suggest a swarming motion around a lightbulb situated in the center of the piece and which casts the piece in a dramatic, cinematic light. The artist’s photographic background translates into this piece, in the play with light and shadow, the sense of suspended motion. The piece was based on a hate crime that occurred blocks from the Living Gallery in 2008. The bat she used for the mold is one from her childhood: one with which she learned to play softball. This is a further heightening of the two poles of the object, at once a symbol of nostalgia and irrational hate. This personal context also heightens the artist’s intimacy with work, and by extension, the act it is based on.

By moving the crime from outside to inside the gallery, the artist asks for all viewers to participate in this intimate understanding of crime, criminal, and victim. Lindsey-Hall says on her website that she was interested in the bat as “an American symbol of masculinity, sport, and in this case, violent object.” Speaking at the artist talk about her interest in casting the bleach bottle, Lindsey-Hall mentioned how she felt the idea of cleansing, the need to “clean” someone who perceived to be dirty or immoral, was wrapped up in the use of the object for violent purposes. The work suggests that these objects, so often encountered and barely noticed, blending into the fabric of daily experience, not only have the potential for violence, but also that their mundane use is not entirely divorced from their violent use. Something about the fantasy of masculinity in the use of the baseball bat, the desire to purify in the use of the bleach, translates with an unsettling ease into an these acts of violence. We are invited to contemplate how the ideology and the violence exists already even in the object’s conventional use. In part due to their reduction to these characterless form, the objects in Phoenix Lindsey-Hall’s show ask the viewer to understand the crimes in which they are used not as a detached observer but as an intimate participant.

PHOTOS: “Flame Tempered” Exhibition by Phoenix Lindsey-Hall

Artist Talk, Potluck and Movie TONIGHT!
Information Below!

Photos from the Opening Reception on November 22nd:

Exhibition Date: November 21 – 26, 2013
Opening Reception: November 22, 2013 from 6:00pm to 10:00pm
Artist Talk, Potluck and Movie: November 25, 2013 from 7:30pm to 10:00pm
Location: The Living Gallery, 1094 Broadway, Brooklyn, NY 11221
For More Information: thelivinggallery@gmail.com
Artist: http://www.phoenixlindseyhall.com/

TONIGHT: “Flame Tempered” A Solo Show by Phoenix Lindsey-Hall

Flame Tempered
Friday, November 22, 2013
6:00pm to 10:00pm
at The Living Gallery

The Living Gallery is proud to announce, “Flame Tempered,” the first New York solo exhibition of mixed media artist Phoenix Lindsey-Hall. With graceful chaos, Lindsey-Hall uses ceramic to transform everyday objects that were used as weapons in specific gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender hate crimes.

The cornerstone of this show is her large-scale ceramic installation, which is derived from a hate crime that happened just blocks from The Living Gallery in 2008. “Flame Tempered” is an organic cyclone of over 70 ceramic baseball bats suspended in a mid air tumble. Illuminated with a single bare bulb casting long shadows through out the space, the work is an explosion of drama, perception and emotion. Peggy McGlone, art critic for The Star Ledger in Newark, NJ, recently described the piece as “at once beautiful and intimidating.”

This exhibition is made possible through support from Slideluck, where Lindsey-Hall recently received Crowd Favorite at Slideluck Bushwick II, The Living Gallery and Brooklyn Brewery.

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AROUND TOWN: Roxanne Jackson – Death Valley

Roxanne Jackson
Roxanne Jackson – Death Valley

October 11, 2013 – November 16, 2013
Opening Reception: October 11, 2013 from 7:00pm to 10:00pm

“AIRPLANE is proud to open our 2013 Fall season with a sculptural installation of recent work by sculptor and ceramic artist Roxanne Jackson.

Jackson makes objects, talismans, mutated creatures; each one rooted in and realized by it’s own inherent craft. Her work combines references to popular horror culture with themes of metamorphosis and transmogrification, using such disparate materials as paper-mache’ and refined glazed ceramics to convey a dichotomy, a vibration, between culturally accepted tropes of the beautiful and the beastly, the banal and sublime.

Her process often involves a literal anchoring of her varied subjects to a base, and by addressing the base as a sculptural element, it presents the work with a supporting root , a sub-ethos, a body; for Death Valley, a large multi-layered plinth installed in the gallery will act as a sort of psycho-fungal mycelium tying the tableau of works together collectively into a discordant harmony, presenting a critique of the growth/mythos of our ever-morphing and redundant popular culture.”

(INFORMATION/TEXT/IMAGE SOURCE)